Archive for the ‘Drawing & Painting’ Category

“Untitled Flower Pattern” (Pen and felt-tip on A4 card, 1997)

Wednesday, December 10th, 1997

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“The Last Days of Sumer” (Vivid on A4, 1998, in the collection of Alexander Greenhough)

Monday, December 21st, 1998


The very first piece of ‘serious’ visual art I ever did, after reading a book of interviews with Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman on a bright summer’s day while living at a University flat on Fairlie Terrace in Wellington. I did another piece in blue vivid on the same day, which has subsequently been lost.

“When painters feel the need to make a shift toward self-discovery, they turn to black and white for a time.” (Barnett Newman)

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“Wayfarer Gallery” (c. 1999, photographed by Alex Greenhough)

Wednesday, December 29th, 1999

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Top, left: Some of my early photocopy works fixed to a large board for inspection. Top, middle: A monochromatic painting, using photocopy ink (in the collection of Erica Lowe). Top, right: An assemblage, possibly made with Tim Wyborn.

Bottom, left: Painting by Mark Whyte (top) and a readymade using styrofoam packaging (bottom). Bottom, right: The remnants of a performance by then Wellington artist Collette [last name unknown].

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“Untitled [Portrait of a Woman]” (Ink on wood, 2000)

Thursday, December 14th, 2000

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Early painting of mine from 2000 made from pouring a bottle of black ink on an old piece of wood. Afterwards I varnished the wood to fix the ink in place. At the time I was drinking heavily and reading a lot of Charles Bukowski and always associated this painting with his book “Women” for some reason.

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“1440: The Smooth and the Striated” (Ballpoint pen on A4, 2005)

Wednesday, December 7th, 2005

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“It seems to us that the Smooth is both the object of a close vision par excellence and the element of a haptic space (which may be as much visual or auditory as tactile). The Striated, on the contrary , relates to a more distant vision, and a more optical space – although the eye in turn is not the only organ to have this capacity. Once again, as always, this analysis must be corrected by a coefficient of transformation according to which passages between the striated and the smooth are at once necessary and uncertain, and all the more disruptive. The law of the painting is that it be done at close range, even if it is viewed from relatively far away. One can back away from a thing, but it is a bad painter who backs away from the painting he or she is working on… Cezanne spoke of the need to no longer see the wheat field, to be too close to it, to lose oneself without landmarks in smooth space. Afterward, striation can emerge: drawing, strata, the earth, ‘stubborn geometry’, the ‘measure of the world’… The striated itself may in turn disappear in a ‘catastrophe’, opening the way for a new smooth space, and another striated space…” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, p544)

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“November 28, 1947: How do you make yourself a body without organs?” (Pen and vivid on A4, 2005)

Monday, December 12th, 2005

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“At any rate, you have one (or several). It’s not so much that it preexists or comes ready-made, although in certain respects it is preexistent. At any rate, you make one, you can’t desire without making one. And it awaits you; it is an inevitable exercise or experimentation, already accomplished the moment you undertake it, unaccomplished as long as you don’t. This is not assuring, because you can botch it. Or it can be terrifying, and lead you to your death. It is nondesire as well as desire. It is not at all a notion or a concept but a practice, a set of practices. You never reach the Body without Organs, you can’t reach it, you are forever attaining it, it is a limit. People ask, So what is this BwO?—But you’re already on it, scurrying like a vermin, groping like a blind person, or running like a lunatic: desert traveler and nomad of the steppes. On it we sleep, live our waking lives, fight—fight and are fought—seek our place, experience untold happiness and fabulous defeats; on it we penetrate and are penetrated; on it we love. On November 28, 1947, Artaud declares war on the organs: To be done with the judgment of God, “for you can tie me up if you wish, but there is nothing more useless than an organ.”‘ Experimentation: not only radiophonic but also biologi cal and political, incurring censorship and repression. Corpus and Socius politics and experimentation. They will not let you experiment in peace.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

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“Geometric Theology [Round, Square, Triangle]” (Pen and vivid on A4, 2005)

Tuesday, December 20th, 2005

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“Perhaps I might begin by noticing how different numbers have found their champions. Two was extolled by Peter Ramus, Four by Pythagoras, Five by Sir Thomas Browne, and so on. For my part, I am a determined foe of no innocent number; I respect and esteem them all in their several ways; but I am forced to confess to a leaning to the number Three in philosophy.” (Charles Sanders Peirce, Trichotomy)

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“Projections” (curated by Tim Wyborn, Enjoy Gallery, Wellington, 2002)

Monday, February 21st, 2011

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Projections was an exhibition involving nine artists [Rick Jensen, Nikki Deeley, Jason O'Dea, Devon Damonte, Dick Whyte, Andy Chappell and Tim Wyborn], working with slide projectors as their medium… The projectors all blew up on the opening night, and one of them refused to stay in sequence during the exhibition, but I didn’t really mind. In fact, I appreciate this because it made the audience more aware of the technology… Projections on walls are a simple idea, but when it comes to actually making it happen, it’s a real bastard. So seeing as the exhibition series was supposed to be about curative acts, I felt that it was good to expose the public to the mechanics of the exhibition.” (Tim Wyborn, curator’s statement)

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“Many of the images are of singular artworks, and are interesting in themselves, but remain a showcase, much like a portfolio of work. Other slides actually use the material as their medium, constructing an image within itself. These I appreciate as they conflict with the other, singular artwork showpieces, more ethereal in nature. Richard Whyte’s mound-like creations [see below] juxtaposed with Nikki Deeley’s artworks for example. They jar the senses; this is stimulating in itself to have so much difference so quickly. Each slide holds fascination in itself. Slightly frustrating, I want to climb in and see the scale, size and texture of Nikki’s artworks. Richard’s, I can view for the painterly quality, and refer to formal attributes in their actuality experiential qualities such as scale, visual texture, collision with other slides that are his on opposite walls.” (review by Kate Kelly, read more)

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Sadly, Tim died on January 2, 2003. He was a dear friend of mine and is remembered with love by his family, friends and the Wellington art community.

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“Tuhoe Never Signed the Fucking Treaty” (Black and red vivid on N.Z. wall map, 2011)

Sunday, June 12th, 2011

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Work produced for the Concerned Citizens auction, to raise money and awareness for the 2007 ‘terror raid’ arrestees, many of whom were Tūhoe activists; “18 people in New Zealand are currently being bankrupted by the cost of fighting questionable charges following the ‘Operation 8’ raids conducted around the country on October 15th, 2007. To address these concerns, more than 50 artists from around New Zealand are exhibiting their work in the hope of raising funds (and awareness) to support the victims of the raids and their families.” (read more)

This work sold for $200, which contributed to the jaw-dropping total of $6500 raised in just 3 short days, with all funds going to the arrestees and their families. Other artists involved in the exhibition included Tao Wells, Arlo Edwards, Kerry Ann Lee, Roger Morris, Hannah Salmon, Ellen Rodda, Bryce Galloway, Campbell Kneale, Richard Meros and Robyn Kenealy (see full list here).

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“Untitled” (Photocopier ink on notepaper, c. 1999)

Friday, July 1st, 2011

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Late one afternoon in 1999 Tim Wyborn and I found an old photocopier toner in the library bin at Victoria University. Seeing the potential, but having no idea what to do, we grabbed it and headed back to my house. On the way Tim decided to smash the toner on my lawn and came up with the formula: SMASHING STUFF = ART. That sounded like fun, which produced a second formula: ART = FUN.

While Tim was smashing the toner, it started to rain and black ink ran all over my front yard (much to the annoyance of my flatmates). While he was doing this I got the idea to lay numerous pieces of paper on the ground around him to capture fragments of the event in plastic form. Never exhibited.

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