Archive for the ‘Photocopy & Photography’ Category

“By Chance I Met Barnett Newman on a Streetcorner: Fuck You Greenberg” (Found Photograph, 1997)

Saturday, December 20th, 1997

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“Newman’s paintings look easy to copy, and maybe they really are. But they are far from easy to conceive, and their quality and meaning lies almost exactly in their conception… The onlooker who says his child could paint a Newman may be right, but Newman would have to be there to tell the child exactly what to do. The exact choices of color, medium, size, proportion – including the size and shape of the support – are what alone determines the quality of the result, and these choices depend solely on inspiration or conception.” (Clement Greenberg, After Abstract Expressionism, 1962)

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“Round [Black Holes Ain't So Black]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Wednesday, December 1st, 1999

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“The lower the mass of the black hole, the higher its temperature. So as the black hole loses mass, its temperature and rate of emission increase, so it loses mass more quickly. What happens when the mass of the black hole eventually becomes extremely small is not quite clear, but the most reasonable guess is that it would disappear completely in a tremendous final burst of emission, equivalent to the explosion of millions of H-bombs.” (Stephen Hawking)

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“A human being is a part of a whole, called by us “universe,” a part limited in time and space. We experience ourselves, our thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of our consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” (Albert Einstein)

Variations on these photocopy works were included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“Squares [This Is Not A Black Square]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Thursday, December 2nd, 1999

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“When, in the year 1913, in my desperate attempt to free art from the ballast of objectivity, I took refuge in the square form and exhibited a picture which consisted of nothing more than a black square on a white field, the critics and, along with them, the public sighed, ‘Everything which we loved is lost. We are in a desert… Before us is nothing but a black square on a white background!’” (Kazimir Malevich)

Variations on these photocopy works were included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“Strings [Lines of Flight]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Friday, December 3rd, 1999

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“Individual or group, we are traversed by lines, meridians, geodesics, tropics, and zones marching to different beats and differing in nature. We said that we are comprised of lines, three kinds of lines. Or rather, bundles of lines, for each kind is multiple. We may be more interested in a certain line than in others, and perhaps there is indeed one that is, not determining, but of greater importance… if it is there. For some of these lines are imposed on us from outside, at least in part. Others sprout up somewhat by chance, from a trifle, why we will never know. Others can be invented, drawn, without a model and without chance: we must invent our lines of flight.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

From a larger collection of photocopy works, two of which were used as the album cover for Jeff Henderson’s “Fuck You You Bureaucratic Fucks” recorded live at “Wayfarer Gallery Presents: A Festiva of Enjoyment” (Enjoy Gallery, 2002) and released by Postmoderncore Records in 2004. Henderson is a free-jazz/drone saxophonist from New Zealand, who I highly recommend checking out. Some of these prints were also included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“Wayfarer Gallery” (c. 1999, photographed by Alex Greenhough)

Wednesday, December 29th, 1999

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Top, left: Some of my early photocopy works fixed to a large board for inspection. Top, middle: A monochromatic painting, using photocopy ink (in the collection of Erica Lowe). Top, right: An assemblage, possibly made with Tim Wyborn.

Bottom, left: Painting by Mark Whyte (top) and a readymade using styrofoam packaging (bottom). Bottom, right: The remnants of a performance by then Wellington artist Collette [last name unknown].

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“August” (Photographs, 2005)

Saturday, December 10th, 2005

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“First. Those whose relation to their objects is a mere community in some quality, and these representations may be termed Likenesses. Second. Those whose relation to their objects consists in a correspondence in fact, and these may be termed Indices or Signs. Third. Those the ground of whose relation to their objects is an imputed character, which are the same as general signs, and these may be termed Symbols.” (C.S. Peirce, On A New Set of Categories)

“C.S. Peirce, whose great importance for the classification of images and signs we have already noted, distinguished between two sorts of images which he called ‘Firstness’ and ‘Secondness’… Peirce does not conceal the fact that firstness is difficult to define, because it is felt, rather than conceived: it concerns what is new in experience, what is fresh, fleeting and nevertheless eternal… Secondness was wherever there were two by themselves: what is what it is in relation to a second. Everything which only exists by being opposed, by and in a duel, therefore belongs to secondness: exertion-resistance, action-reaction, excitation-response, situation-behaviour, individual-milieu… It is the category of the Real, of the actual, of the existing, of the individuated… After having distinguished between affection and action, which he calls Firstness and Secondness, Peirce adds a third kind of image: the ‘mental’ or Thirdness. The point of thirdness was a term that referred to a second term through the intermediary of another term or terms. This third instance appeared in signification, law or relation. This may seem to be already included in action, but this is not so. An action, that is to say a duel or a pair of forces, obeys laws which make it possible, but it is never its law which makes it act.” (Gilles Deleuze, The Movement Image)

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“Projections” (curated by Tim Wyborn, Enjoy Gallery, Wellington, 2002)

Monday, February 21st, 2011

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Projections was an exhibition involving nine artists [Rick Jensen, Nikki Deeley, Jason O'Dea, Devon Damonte, Dick Whyte, Andy Chappell and Tim Wyborn], working with slide projectors as their medium… The projectors all blew up on the opening night, and one of them refused to stay in sequence during the exhibition, but I didn’t really mind. In fact, I appreciate this because it made the audience more aware of the technology… Projections on walls are a simple idea, but when it comes to actually making it happen, it’s a real bastard. So seeing as the exhibition series was supposed to be about curative acts, I felt that it was good to expose the public to the mechanics of the exhibition.” (Tim Wyborn, curator’s statement)

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“Many of the images are of singular artworks, and are interesting in themselves, but remain a showcase, much like a portfolio of work. Other slides actually use the material as their medium, constructing an image within itself. These I appreciate as they conflict with the other, singular artwork showpieces, more ethereal in nature. Richard Whyte’s mound-like creations [see below] juxtaposed with Nikki Deeley’s artworks for example. They jar the senses; this is stimulating in itself to have so much difference so quickly. Each slide holds fascination in itself. Slightly frustrating, I want to climb in and see the scale, size and texture of Nikki’s artworks. Richard’s, I can view for the painterly quality, and refer to formal attributes in their actuality experiential qualities such as scale, visual texture, collision with other slides that are his on opposite walls.” (review by Kate Kelly, read more)

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Sadly, Tim died on January 2, 2003. He was a dear friend of mine and is remembered with love by his family, friends and the Wellington art community.

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“Pieces of Me, No. 1 & 2″ (Photochop, Thistle Hall, 2011, curated by Markus McIntyre)

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

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Two A1 collages using images of Britney Spears, made for Photochop III (curated by Markus McIntyre, Thistle Hall, 2011); “A collective exhibition of collage images from print using photo chop, scissors and glue… salut[ing] the dawn of photo lithography, the 120 year old tradition of processing images for the mass print medium.” My Britney collages were laminated and displayed on various doors around the gallery, in the way that a poster might appear in a teenage bedroom. The exhibition also featured work by Claire Harris, Will Frew, Robyn Kenealy, Ruby Nekk, Sam Stephens, Don Smith, Curtis Nixon and Di Dixon (among others).

On the opening night I also performed as Supercomposer for the first time (see below) alongside The Unknown Rockstar and The Doll, reproducing a number of my Britney Spears + Noise = HOT remixes in a live setting (and some other bits and pieces, including a HOT Jay-Z vs. Kevin Drumm mashup).

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“On this week at Thistle Hall is the biennial PhotoChop exhibition, centered around the art of collage… with a selection of fine works including repurposed postcards, a scenic Urewera setting for Willie Apiata and a couple of fine posters celebrating the golden years of Britney Spears.” (Wellingtonista, read more)

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“Untitled” (Photocopier ink on notepaper, c. 1999)

Friday, July 1st, 2011

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Late one afternoon in 1999 Tim Wyborn and I found an old photocopier toner in the library bin at Victoria University. Seeing the potential, but having no idea what to do, we grabbed it and headed back to my house. On the way Tim decided to smash the toner on my lawn and came up with the formula: SMASHING STUFF = ART. That sounded like fun, which produced a second formula: ART = FUN.

While Tim was smashing the toner, it started to rain and black ink ran all over my front yard (much to the annoyance of my flatmates). While he was doing this I got the idea to lay numerous pieces of paper on the ground around him to capture fragments of the event in plastic form. Never exhibited.

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