Archive for the ‘Geometry’ Category

“By Chance I Met Barnett Newman on a Streetcorner: Fuck You Greenberg” (Found Photograph, 1997)

Saturday, December 20th, 1997

..

..

“Newman’s paintings look easy to copy, and maybe they really are. But they are far from easy to conceive, and their quality and meaning lies almost exactly in their conception… The onlooker who says his child could paint a Newman may be right, but Newman would have to be there to tell the child exactly what to do. The exact choices of color, medium, size, proportion – including the size and shape of the support – are what alone determines the quality of the result, and these choices depend solely on inspiration or conception.” (Clement Greenberg, After Abstract Expressionism, 1962)

..

“The Last Days of Sumer” (Vivid on A4, 1998, in the collection of Alexander Greenhough)

Monday, December 21st, 1998


The very first piece of ‘serious’ visual art I ever did, after reading a book of interviews with Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman on a bright summer’s day while living at a University flat on Fairlie Terrace in Wellington. I did another piece in blue vivid on the same day, which has subsequently been lost.

“When painters feel the need to make a shift toward self-discovery, they turn to black and white for a time.” (Barnett Newman)

..

“Round [Black Holes Ain’t So Black]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Wednesday, December 1st, 1999

..

“The lower the mass of the black hole, the higher its temperature. So as the black hole loses mass, its temperature and rate of emission increase, so it loses mass more quickly. What happens when the mass of the black hole eventually becomes extremely small is not quite clear, but the most reasonable guess is that it would disappear completely in a tremendous final burst of emission, equivalent to the explosion of millions of H-bombs.” (Stephen Hawking)

..

..

..

..

..

..

“A human being is a part of a whole, called by us “universe,” a part limited in time and space. We experience ourselves, our thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of our consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” (Albert Einstein)

Variations on these photocopy works were included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

..

“Squares [This Is Not A Black Square]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Thursday, December 2nd, 1999

..

..

..

..

..

“When, in the year 1913, in my desperate attempt to free art from the ballast of objectivity, I took refuge in the square form and exhibited a picture which consisted of nothing more than a black square on a white field, the critics and, along with them, the public sighed, ‘Everything which we loved is lost. We are in a desert… Before us is nothing but a black square on a white background!'” (Kazimir Malevich)

Variations on these photocopy works were included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

..

“Strings [Lines of Flight]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Friday, December 3rd, 1999

..

..

..

..

“Individual or group, we are traversed by lines, meridians, geodesics, tropics, and zones marching to different beats and differing in nature. We said that we are comprised of lines, three kinds of lines. Or rather, bundles of lines, for each kind is multiple. We may be more interested in a certain line than in others, and perhaps there is indeed one that is, not determining, but of greater importance… if it is there. For some of these lines are imposed on us from outside, at least in part. Others sprout up somewhat by chance, from a trifle, why we will never know. Others can be invented, drawn, without a model and without chance: we must invent our lines of flight.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

From a larger collection of photocopy works, two of which were used as the album cover for Jeff Henderson’s “Fuck You You Bureaucratic Fucks” recorded live at “Wayfarer Gallery Presents: A Festiva of Enjoyment” (Enjoy Gallery, 2002) and released by Postmoderncore Records in 2004. Henderson is a free-jazz/drone saxophonist from New Zealand, who I highly recommend checking out. Some of these prints were also included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

..


..

..

“Untitled [Portrait of a Woman]” (Ink on wood, 2000)

Thursday, December 14th, 2000

..

..

Early painting of mine from 2000 made from pouring a bottle of black ink on an old piece of wood. Afterwards I varnished the wood to fix the ink in place. At the time I was drinking heavily and reading a lot of Charles Bukowski and always associated this painting with his book “Women” for some reason.

..

“Stool Sample” (Readymade, 2001)

Thursday, December 20th, 2001

..

..

“A point that I want very much to establish is that the choice of these ‘readymades’ was never dictated by aesthetic delectation. The choice was based on a reaction of visual indifference with at the same time a total absence of good or bad taste in fact a complete anaesthesia. One important characteristic was the short sentence which I occasionally inscribed on the ‘readymade.’ That sentence instead of describing the object like a title was meant to carry the mind of the spectator towards other regions more verbal. Sometimes I would add a graphic detail of presentation which, in order to satisfy my craving for alliterations, would be called ‘readymade aided.’ At another time, wanted to expose the basic anatomy between art and ‘readymades,’ I imagined a reciprocal readymade: use a Rembrandt as an ironing board! I realized very soon the danger of repeating indiscriminately this form of expression and decided to limit the productions of ‘readymades’ to a small number yearly. I was aware at that time, that for the spectator even more than for the artist, art is a habit forming drug and I wanted to protect my ‘readymades’ against such a contamination. Another aspect of the ‘readymade’ is its lack of uniqueness. The replica of the ‘readymade’ delivering the same message. In fact nearly every one of the ‘readymades’ existing today is not original in the conventional sense.” (Marcel Duchamp)

..

“Lunar” (Video Art, 2004)

Friday, December 24th, 2004

..

..

Video poem of the moon. First screened as part of Scenes From the Aro Valley, curated by Campbell Walker (Paramount Theatre, Wellington, 20-23 April, 2006). Also featuring films by Colin Hodson, Alex Greenhough, Elric Kane, Diane McAllen, Andy Chappell and Campbell Walker. Part of a suite of videos made in 2004.

Five experimental shorts in about 7 minutes by Richard (Dick) Whyte, among other things a ghost in the margins of almost all the Aro Valley films, and possibly the least known and most active filmmaker involved with the movement.” (Campbell Walker, Scenes from the Aro Valley programme notes)

“[Sergei] Eisenstein, we recall, championed the use of ‘montage’ theory in film. Here film communicated by a succession of juxtaposed images that did not need to have a linear, narrative or consequential relationship between them. Shot ‘A’ followed by shot ‘B’ created a new meaning ‘C’ in the mind of the viewer. Eisenstein likened this to ‘haiku’ – a traditional Japanese poetic form in which a short succession of separate images combines in the mind of the reader to create a total meaning which is greater than the sum of its component parts. In this way, meaning is suggested rather than stated. Eisenstein hoped to communicate specific meanings, but in the haiku… the implication is far more abstract.” (Richard Howells, Visual Culture)

“Maya Deren had attempted to find a filmic equivalent to the haiku shortly before her death. She left the project incomplete. [Stan] Brakhage too used the analogy to the haiku in discussing his 8mm Songs. By including the two haiku series in Lost, Lost, Lost [Jonas] Mekas contextualized them as steps in the development of his poetic incarnation as a film-maker.” (P. Adams Sitney, Eyes Upside Down: Visionary Filmmakers and the Heritage of Emerson)

..

“This is not a black square” (Video Art, 2004)

Wednesday, December 29th, 2004

..

..

Animated film made from a series of black and white photocopies, dedicated to Kazimir Malevich and Rene Magritte. First screened at the experimental film evening ‘Iris Out’, curated by Diane McAllen (New Zealand Film Archive, Wellington, Nov. 2004). Subsequently screened as part of ‘Experimental Film & Video Art’ curated by Zoe Roland (The Physics Room, Christchurch, March 2006) and the exhibition ‘Still Moving: From Photography to Interactive Art’ (Corban Estate Art Center, Auckland, June 2006). Part of a suite of videos made in 2004.

“In the tradition of Stan Brakhage, Len Lye and contemporary video artists such as Gillian Wearing this selection of works seeks to develop a new language uncompromised by mainstream cinema and orthodox narrative constructions. This programme of experimental film and video art provides a snapshot of artistic activity around the moving image.” (The Physics Roomread more)

..

..

..

“1440: The Smooth and the Striated” (Ballpoint pen on A4, 2005)

Wednesday, December 7th, 2005

..

..

..

“It seems to us that the Smooth is both the object of a close vision par excellence and the element of a haptic space (which may be as much visual or auditory as tactile). The Striated, on the contrary , relates to a more distant vision, and a more optical space – although the eye in turn is not the only organ to have this capacity. Once again, as always, this analysis must be corrected by a coefficient of transformation according to which passages between the striated and the smooth are at once necessary and uncertain, and all the more disruptive. The law of the painting is that it be done at close range, even if it is viewed from relatively far away. One can back away from a thing, but it is a bad painter who backs away from the painting he or she is working on… Cezanne spoke of the need to no longer see the wheat field, to be too close to it, to lose oneself without landmarks in smooth space. Afterward, striation can emerge: drawing, strata, the earth, ‘stubborn geometry’, the ‘measure of the world’… The striated itself may in turn disappear in a ‘catastrophe’, opening the way for a new smooth space, and another striated space…” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, p544)

..