Posts Tagged ‘Digital Painting’

“Universal Cartography” (Digital Drawing, 2007)

Saturday, December 22nd, 2007

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“The diagram is no longer an auditory or visual archive but a map, a cartography that is coextensive with the whole social field.” (Gilles Deleuze, A New Cartographer)

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“Nut [for Matisse]” (Digital Painting, 2007)

Sunday, December 23rd, 2007

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“When we speak of Nature it is wrong to forget that we are ourselves a part of Nature. We ought to view ourselves with the same curiosity and openness with which we study a tree, the sky or a thought, because we too are linked to the entire universe.” (Henri Matisse)

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“Who’s Afraid of Barnett Newman?” (Digital Painting, 2008)

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

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“It is not difficult to see how Greenberg’s own program for color-field painting and his ideas on the development of modernism leave little room for an explanation of Newman’s zips. In effect, they are the elements which support Greenberg’s ideas the least. In the rare cases when he describes the zips, he does so briefly and asserts that Newman’s art is not really geometrical and that there are other, less noticeable factors that are more important to an interpretation of his work.” (Samantha Krukowski, Was Greenberg Blind to Barnett Newman’s Zips?)

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“U.S.N.Z. Flag” (Digital Paintings, 2009, thanks to Tao Wells)

Friday, December 4th, 2009

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Designs for a new New Zealand flag representing our nations unconscious split-personality (the motherland on one side, the fatherland on the other). Inspired by Tao Wells’ Global American Flags, Michael Billig’s Banal Nationalism (thanks to Robyn Kenealy) and the Herald’s call for a new NZ flag in 2009 (given support by National leader and current prime-minister John Key, as well as 11 members of the so-called ‘Order of New Zealand’).

“The central thesis of the present book is that, in the established nations, there is a continual ‘flagging’, or reminding, of nationhood. The established nations are those states that have confidence in their own continuity, and that, particularly, are part of what is conventionally described as ‘the West’. The political leaders of such nations – whether France, the USA, the United Kingdom or New Zealand – are not typically termed ‘nationalists’. However, as will be suggested, nationhood provides a continual background for their political discourses, for cultural products, and even for the structuring of newspapers. In so many little ways, the citizenry are daily reminded of their national place in a world of nations. However, this reminding is so familiar, so continual, that it is not consciously registered as reminding. The metonymic image of banal nationalism is not a flag which is being consciously waved with fervent passion; it is the flag hanging unnoticed on the public building.” (Michael Billig, Banal Nationalism)

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“Odalisques” (Digital Paintings, 2010)

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

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“Some feminist critics (most notably Linda Nochlin) have argued that the nineteenth-century male artist’s preoccupation with languid, nude odalisques who are “veiled” from the European male gaze and yet blatantly engage in self-display on the canvas, repeatedly feminized and sexualized the Orient in disempowering ways. Recent studies by Alison Smith, Carol Ockman, and Griselda Pollock, however, have demonstrated that the cultural tensions within which the odalisque/nineteenth-century female nude emerged were more complicated. All exoticized female or male bodies were not displayed in the same way… If we look closely at several French works that spanned the nineteenth century – Ingres’ Grande Odalisque (1814); Henri Regnault’s Salome (1870); and two works by Gerome, The Almeh (1878) and Woman of Cairo (1882) — the body of the odalisque is layered, revealing tensions and ambiguities. The Grande Odalisque was commissioned by a female aristocrat, Caroline Bonaparte Murat — a practice which was common among aristocratic women in the early nineteenth century [which] allowed them access to modes of self-representation outside the range of what was considered ‘acceptable’ and consolidated their socially and politically powerful roles.” (Piya Pal-Lapinski, The Exotic Woman in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction and Culture: A Reconsideration)

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“Paris Hilton – After The Bath” (Digital Paintings, 2010)

Sunday, July 18th, 2010

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Part of a series of works superimposing still images from Paris Hilton’s ‘bath’ video (which has commonly been labelled a ‘sex tape’) over top of classical paintings of women bathing. See more from this series.

“Historically, the bending-bather pose goes as far back as Raphael’s tapestry cartoon. As a bodily trope, the bending single female bather traces it ancestry to Rembrandt’s A Woman Bathing in a Stream of 1654-1656 in the Nation Gallery, London… It may owe its longevity as a pose at least in part to the challenge it presents to the skill of the artist in terms of foreshortening. The bending-bather pose is picked up in the nineteenth century, outdoors, in the bending-bather figure of in Manet’s Le Bain/Dejeuner. And in the Twentieth [Century], it is spectacularly reworked by Picasso in his endlessly inventive series of grotesque variations on Le Dejeuner, which to me, at least, owe as much to Degas’ bathers as to Manet’s. Yet, while such tracing of the motif tells us about its long-term endurance and the challenge it offers to succeeding generations of artists (head low, long expanse of back, foreshortened view), it does not help us with the more difficult task of interpreting this image, of accounting for its vividness and seductive complexity…” (LInda Nochlin, Bathers, Bodies, Beauty: The Visceral Eye)

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“Paris Hilton – Portrait of a Nude Woman” (Digital Paintings, 2010)

Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

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Part of a series of works superimposing still images from Paris Hilton’s ‘bath’ video (which has commonly been labelled a ‘sex tape’) over top of classical paintings of women bathing. See more from this series.

“The thrust of [John] Berger’s argument is that the artistic nude is no different from the soft porn nude, existing to fulfil male voyeurism and desire for possession. He argues that all but a few of the hundreds of thousands of nudes in European painting were designed to appeal to sexuality of the man looking at the picture. The sexuality of the woman, he says, ‘needs to be minimized so that the spectator may feel that he has the monopoly of such passion. Women are there to feed an appetite, not to have any of their own… You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, you put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting Vanity, thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for your own pleasure’.” (John Robinson, The Judgment of Paris)

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“Glitch Archive” (Digital Paintings, 2010-2011)

Monday, February 14th, 2011

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“The dominant, continuing search for a noiseless channel has been, and will always be no more than a regrettable, ill-fated dogma. Even though the constant search for complete transparency brings newer, ‘better’ media, every one of these new and improved technologies will always have their own fingerprints of imperfection. While most people experience these fingerprints as negative (and sometimes even as accidents) I emphasize the positive consequences of these imperfections by showing the new opportunities they facilitate.” (Rosa Menkman, Glitch Studies Manifesto)

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“Paris Hilton – The Bather” (Digital Paintings, 2011)

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

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Part of a series of works superimposing still images from Paris Hilton’s ‘bath’ video (which has commonly been labelled a ‘sex tape’) over top of classical paintings of women bathing. See more from this series. Many thanks to Meghan Dougherty for featuring these works on Tumblr.

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