Posts Tagged ‘Feminist Art’

“Britney Spears – Born To Make You Happy” (Animated GIF, 2010)

Saturday, May 29th, 2010

..

..

..

..

Animated GIFs made out of unedited screencaps from the game “Britney Spears Date Dressup” on Girl Games, one of the leading online gaming websites for young girls, dominated by dress-up, cooking and decorating games.

“The construction of children’s gendered identities cannot be fully understood without acknowledging  how the dominant discourses of femininity and masculinity are heteronormalized in children’s everyday lives. That is, through the process of gendering children are constructed as heterosexual beings.” (Robinson, in Kerry Robinson and Cristyn Davies, Tomboys and Sissy Girls: Young Girls’ Negotiations of Femininity and Masculinity)

..

“Britney Spears – I’m A Slave 4 U” (Animated GIF, 2010)

Sunday, May 30th, 2010

..

..

One of two works exploring Britney Spears shaving her head and its relation to gender. Animated GIF made out of unedited screencaps from the game “Britney Spears Makeover” on Girl Games, one of the leading online gaming websites for young girls, dominated by dress-up, cooking and decorating games.

“I suspect that the day Britney Spears shaved her own hair off represented a kind of Sartrean or Socratic argument (rather than, say, a nervous breakdown). She was, in effect, by the use of appearance, shrewdly de-mythifying beauty. The hair lies on the floor, “inexplicably faded” (Sartre), and the conventional notion of femininity likewise.” (Andy Martin, The Phenomenology of Ugly)

..

“Katherine Heigl – 27 Dresses” (Animated GIF, 2010)

Saturday, June 12th, 2010

..

..

Animated GIF made out of unedited screencaps from the game “Katherine Heigl Dressup” on Girl Games, one of the leading online gaming websites for young girls, “the best place to play games made just for girls! Girl Games has only the most fun puzzle, cooking, action, sport, decorating and dressup games online!”

..

“Odalisques” (Digital Paintings, 2010)

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

..

..

..

..

..

“Some feminist critics (most notably Linda Nochlin) have argued that the nineteenth-century male artist’s preoccupation with languid, nude odalisques who are “veiled” from the European male gaze and yet blatantly engage in self-display on the canvas, repeatedly feminized and sexualized the Orient in disempowering ways. Recent studies by Alison Smith, Carol Ockman, and Griselda Pollock, however, have demonstrated that the cultural tensions within which the odalisque/nineteenth-century female nude emerged were more complicated. All exoticized female or male bodies were not displayed in the same way… If we look closely at several French works that spanned the nineteenth century – Ingres’ Grande Odalisque (1814); Henri Regnault’s Salome (1870); and two works by Gerome, The Almeh (1878) and Woman of Cairo (1882) — the body of the odalisque is layered, revealing tensions and ambiguities. The Grande Odalisque was commissioned by a female aristocrat, Caroline Bonaparte Murat — a practice which was common among aristocratic women in the early nineteenth century [which] allowed them access to modes of self-representation outside the range of what was considered ‘acceptable’ and consolidated their socially and politically powerful roles.” (Piya Pal-Lapinski, The Exotic Woman in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction and Culture: A Reconsideration)

..

“Paris Hilton – After The Bath” (Digital Paintings, 2010)

Sunday, July 18th, 2010

..

..

..

Part of a series of works superimposing still images from Paris Hilton’s ‘bath’ video (which has commonly been labelled a ‘sex tape’) over top of classical paintings of women bathing. See more from this series.

“Historically, the bending-bather pose goes as far back as Raphael’s tapestry cartoon. As a bodily trope, the bending single female bather traces it ancestry to Rembrandt’s A Woman Bathing in a Stream of 1654-1656 in the Nation Gallery, London… It may owe its longevity as a pose at least in part to the challenge it presents to the skill of the artist in terms of foreshortening. The bending-bather pose is picked up in the nineteenth century, outdoors, in the bending-bather figure of in Manet’s Le Bain/Dejeuner. And in the Twentieth [Century], it is spectacularly reworked by Picasso in his endlessly inventive series of grotesque variations on Le Dejeuner, which to me, at least, owe as much to Degas’ bathers as to Manet’s. Yet, while such tracing of the motif tells us about its long-term endurance and the challenge it offers to succeeding generations of artists (head low, long expanse of back, foreshortened view), it does not help us with the more difficult task of interpreting this image, of accounting for its vividness and seductive complexity…” (LInda Nochlin, Bathers, Bodies, Beauty: The Visceral Eye)

..

“Paris Hilton – Portrait of a Nude Woman” (Digital Paintings, 2010)

Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

..

..

..

Part of a series of works superimposing still images from Paris Hilton’s ‘bath’ video (which has commonly been labelled a ‘sex tape’) over top of classical paintings of women bathing. See more from this series.

“The thrust of [John] Berger’s argument is that the artistic nude is no different from the soft porn nude, existing to fulfil male voyeurism and desire for possession. He argues that all but a few of the hundreds of thousands of nudes in European painting were designed to appeal to sexuality of the man looking at the picture. The sexuality of the woman, he says, ‘needs to be minimized so that the spectator may feel that he has the monopoly of such passion. Women are there to feed an appetite, not to have any of their own… You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, you put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting Vanity, thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for your own pleasure’.” (John Robinson, The Judgment of Paris)

..

“On Several Regimes of Signs: Carolee Schneemann and Paris Hilton” (Video Art, 2010)

Sunday, July 25th, 2010

..

..

“I define feminist art as images and visualizations and actions which readdress the suppression, the marginalization and the denigration of works made by women for… for me, for over a thousand years. That’s the repression that I’ve been addressing.” (Carolee Schneemann)

“I have been thinking about something I’m been hearing, reading, everyday, especially now with politics, how he changed his mind, he changes his mind. Changing one’s mind as something bad, evil almost. I think that changing one’s mind is one of the best things that there is… Why I was thinking today about changing one’s mind — you won’t believe me — all the papers writing and making jokes about Paris Hilton. Paris saying that she changed, that she is not what she was two days ago, three days, changing her mind. And everybody making jokes, you know, that’s about her saying this. I was thinking how people don’t believe that any change can happen that would be positive. We have become so skeptical, so negative. We don’t believe anymore in slow or sudden changes… I am not saying that Paris has really changed – I am only reacting to the press, to their reactions, to their negativity and attitude towards changing of one’s mind, of becoming different.” (Jonas Mekas)

..

“Of The Refrain: Art Must Be Beautiful, Artist Must Be Beautiful” (Video Art, 2010)

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

..

..

Experimental video art mashup of Britney Spears and Marina Abramovic. Part of a series of film adaptations of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s “Capitalism and Schizophrenia 2: A Thousand Plateaus.” Many thanks to the fashion blog Eternal Optimist for reposting this recently. One of two works exploring Britney Spears shaving her head and its relation to gender.

“I have to tell you something – they say she is about to go through a nervous breakdown. I mean I am going through, almost practically every day, through a nervous mini-breakdown and nervous breakdowns are very necessarily. And artists who don’t go through nervous breakdowns I don’t trust them. I don’t think I even like them. They are no good. They are just square, too normal. For an artist to be normal is a disaster. So, leave her alone, you square, normal, boring people… It has nothing to do with what she is singing or not singing. I am talking about her as a person… I am talking about the inside.” (Jonas Mekas on Britney Spears)

“I suspect that the day Britney Spears shaved her own hair off represented a kind of Sartrean or Socratic argument (rather than, say, a nervous breakdown). She was, in effect, by the use of appearance, shrewdly de-mythifying beauty. The hair lies on the floor, “inexplicably faded” (Sartre), and the conventional notion of femininity likewise.” (Andy Martin, The Phenomenology of Ugly)

“I brush my hair with a metal brush held in my right hand and simultaneously comb my hair with a metal comb held in my left hand. While so doing, I continuously repeat ‘Art must be beautiful’, ‘Artist must be beautiful’, until I have destroyed my hair and face.” (Marina Abramovic)

..

“Paris Hilton – The Bather” (Digital Paintings, 2011)

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

Part of a series of works superimposing still images from Paris Hilton’s ‘bath’ video (which has commonly been labelled a ‘sex tape’) over top of classical paintings of women bathing. See more from this series. Many thanks to Meghan Dougherty for featuring these works on Tumblr.

..

..

COLLABORATION: “Born In Gore” (Claire Harris, Video Art, 2011)

Friday, April 13th, 2012

..

..

Video work by Wellington artist Claire Harris exploring the relationship between colonialisation and feminism. I operated the camera, Matt Whitwell did the sound recording, and Euan Robertson played the bagpipes. Originally screened as part of Typical Girls: Comedic Feminist Video from Wellington (curated by Bryce Galloway, Wellington Film Archive, 2011).

..