Posts Tagged ‘Gilles Deleuze’

“Strings [Lines of Flight]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Friday, December 3rd, 1999

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“Individual or group, we are traversed by lines, meridians, geodesics, tropics, and zones marching to different beats and differing in nature. We said that we are comprised of lines, three kinds of lines. Or rather, bundles of lines, for each kind is multiple. We may be more interested in a certain line than in others, and perhaps there is indeed one that is, not determining, but of greater importance… if it is there. For some of these lines are imposed on us from outside, at least in part. Others sprout up somewhat by chance, from a trifle, why we will never know. Others can be invented, drawn, without a model and without chance: we must invent our lines of flight.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

From a larger collection of photocopy works, two of which were used as the album cover for Jeff Henderson’s “Fuck You You Bureaucratic Fucks” recorded live at “Wayfarer Gallery Presents: A Festiva of Enjoyment” (Enjoy Gallery, 2002) and released by Postmoderncore Records in 2004. Henderson is a free-jazz/drone saxophonist from New Zealand, who I highly recommend checking out. Some of these prints were also included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“1440: The Smooth and the Striated” (Ballpoint pen on A4, 2005)

Wednesday, December 7th, 2005

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“It seems to us that the Smooth is both the object of a close vision par excellence and the element of a haptic space (which may be as much visual or auditory as tactile). The Striated, on the contrary , relates to a more distant vision, and a more optical space – although the eye in turn is not the only organ to have this capacity. Once again, as always, this analysis must be corrected by a coefficient of transformation according to which passages between the striated and the smooth are at once necessary and uncertain, and all the more disruptive. The law of the painting is that it be done at close range, even if it is viewed from relatively far away. One can back away from a thing, but it is a bad painter who backs away from the painting he or she is working on… Cezanne spoke of the need to no longer see the wheat field, to be too close to it, to lose oneself without landmarks in smooth space. Afterward, striation can emerge: drawing, strata, the earth, ‘stubborn geometry’, the ‘measure of the world’… The striated itself may in turn disappear in a ‘catastrophe’, opening the way for a new smooth space, and another striated space…” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, p544)

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“August” (Photographs, 2005)

Saturday, December 10th, 2005

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“First. Those whose relation to their objects is a mere community in some quality, and these representations may be termed Likenesses. Second. Those whose relation to their objects consists in a correspondence in fact, and these may be termed Indices or Signs. Third. Those the ground of whose relation to their objects is an imputed character, which are the same as general signs, and these may be termed Symbols.” (C.S. Peirce, On A New Set of Categories)

“C.S. Peirce, whose great importance for the classification of images and signs we have already noted, distinguished between two sorts of images which he called ‘Firstness’ and ‘Secondness’… Peirce does not conceal the fact that firstness is difficult to define, because it is felt, rather than conceived: it concerns what is new in experience, what is fresh, fleeting and nevertheless eternal… Secondness was wherever there were two by themselves: what is what it is in relation to a second. Everything which only exists by being opposed, by and in a duel, therefore belongs to secondness: exertion-resistance, action-reaction, excitation-response, situation-behaviour, individual-milieu… It is the category of the Real, of the actual, of the existing, of the individuated… After having distinguished between affection and action, which he calls Firstness and Secondness, Peirce adds a third kind of image: the ‘mental’ or Thirdness. The point of thirdness was a term that referred to a second term through the intermediary of another term or terms. This third instance appeared in signification, law or relation. This may seem to be already included in action, but this is not so. An action, that is to say a duel or a pair of forces, obeys laws which make it possible, but it is never its law which makes it act.” (Gilles Deleuze, The Movement Image)

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“November 28, 1947: How do you make yourself a body without organs?” (Pen and vivid on A4, 2005)

Monday, December 12th, 2005

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“At any rate, you have one (or several). It’s not so much that it preexists or comes ready-made, although in certain respects it is preexistent. At any rate, you make one, you can’t desire without making one. And it awaits you; it is an inevitable exercise or experimentation, already accomplished the moment you undertake it, unaccomplished as long as you don’t. This is not assuring, because you can botch it. Or it can be terrifying, and lead you to your death. It is nondesire as well as desire. It is not at all a notion or a concept but a practice, a set of practices. You never reach the Body without Organs, you can’t reach it, you are forever attaining it, it is a limit. People ask, So what is this BwO?—But you’re already on it, scurrying like a vermin, groping like a blind person, or running like a lunatic: desert traveler and nomad of the steppes. On it we sleep, live our waking lives, fight—fight and are fought—seek our place, experience untold happiness and fabulous defeats; on it we penetrate and are penetrated; on it we love. On November 28, 1947, Artaud declares war on the organs: To be done with the judgment of God, “for you can tie me up if you wish, but there is nothing more useless than an organ.”‘ Experimentation: not only radiophonic but also biologi cal and political, incurring censorship and repression. Corpus and Socius politics and experimentation. They will not let you experiment in peace.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

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“Universal Cartography” (Digital Drawing, 2007)

Saturday, December 22nd, 2007

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“The diagram is no longer an auditory or visual archive but a map, a cartography that is coextensive with the whole social field.” (Gilles Deleuze, A New Cartographer)

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“That Dog Gone Egg” (Digital Painting, 2007)

Sunday, December 30th, 2007



“It’s a Dogon’s egg,” explains Félix. “Just hold it in your hand, and you’ll get to the Body without Organs.” (Felix Guattari, in Choose Your Own Philosophical Adventure #1: Escape from the Dialectic)

“I embrace that throne which is in Unu, and I keep guard over the Egg of Nekek-ur.” (The Book of the Dead: Words of Emergence by Day)

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“Capitalism and Schizophrenia: The Game” (Video Art, 2010)

Sunday, July 11th, 2010

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Compilation of suicide videos performed on the video game Grand Theft Auto 4, sourced from YouTube. Part of a series of film adaptations of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s “A Thousand Plateaus.”

Inspired by the Tao Wells video “A View To A Kill,” which consisted of a split screen video recording of Wells playing a two player first person shooter. In the top screen stands Player 1, unmoving. In the bottom screen Player 2, controlled by Tao, begins searching for Player 1. When Player 2 finds Player 1 he shoots him in the head. Cut. Repeat. Player 1 is still motionless in the top half of the screen, while Player 2 starts the hunt again. Finding Player 1, he slits their throat. Cut. Repeat ad nauseam. In Tao’s film there is a detailed exploration of our love of killing others. Here, we have the natural conclusion – we kill ourselves over and over again.

“Of course, capitalism was and remains a formidable desiring machine. The monary flux, the means of production, of manpower, of new markets, all that is the flow of desire. It’s enough to consider the sum of contingencies at the origin of capitalism to see to what degree it has been a crossroads of desires, and that its infrastructure, even its economy, was inseparable from the phenomena of desire. And fascism too — one must say that it has “assumed the social desires,” including the desires of repression and death. People got hard-ons for Hitler, for the beautiful fascist machine. But if your question means: was capitalism revolutionary in its beginnings, has the industrial revolution ever coincided with a social revolution? No, I don’t thing so. Capitalism has been tied from its birth to a savage repressiveness; it had it’s organization of power and its state apparatus from the start. Did capitalism imply a dissolution of the previous social codes and powers? Certainly. But it had already established its wheels of power, including its power of state, in the fissures of previous regimes. It is always like that: things are not so progressive; even before a social formation is established, its instruments of exploitation and repression are already there, still turning in the vacuum, but ready to work at full capacity. The first capitalists are like waiting birds of prey. They wait for their meeting with the worker, the one who drops through the cracks of the preceding system.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Capitalism: A Very Special Delirium)

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“Of The Refrain: Art Must Be Beautiful, Artist Must Be Beautiful” (Video Art, 2010)

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

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Experimental video art mashup of Britney Spears and Marina Abramovic. Part of a series of film adaptations of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s “Capitalism and Schizophrenia 2: A Thousand Plateaus.” Many thanks to the fashion blog Eternal Optimist for reposting this recently. One of two works exploring Britney Spears shaving her head and its relation to gender.

“I have to tell you something – they say she is about to go through a nervous breakdown. I mean I am going through, almost practically every day, through a nervous mini-breakdown and nervous breakdowns are very necessarily. And artists who don’t go through nervous breakdowns I don’t trust them. I don’t think I even like them. They are no good. They are just square, too normal. For an artist to be normal is a disaster. So, leave her alone, you square, normal, boring people… It has nothing to do with what she is singing or not singing. I am talking about her as a person… I am talking about the inside.” (Jonas Mekas on Britney Spears)

“I suspect that the day Britney Spears shaved her own hair off represented a kind of Sartrean or Socratic argument (rather than, say, a nervous breakdown). She was, in effect, by the use of appearance, shrewdly de-mythifying beauty. The hair lies on the floor, “inexplicably faded” (Sartre), and the conventional notion of femininity likewise.” (Andy Martin, The Phenomenology of Ugly)

“I brush my hair with a metal brush held in my right hand and simultaneously comb my hair with a metal comb held in my left hand. While so doing, I continuously repeat ‘Art must be beautiful’, ‘Artist must be beautiful’, until I have destroyed my hair and face.” (Marina Abramovic)

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“Year Zero: Faciality” (Video Art, 2010)

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

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Poetic reworking of the first ever television broadcast made by John Logie Baird in the 1930s, using 78rpm discs. Original footage sourced from YouTube. Part of a series of film adaptations of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s “Capitalism and Schizophrenia 2: A Thousand Plateaus.”

“The face is part of a surface-holes, holey surface, system. This system should under no circumstances be confused with the volume-cavity system proper to the (proprioceptive) body. The head is included in the body, but the face is not. The face is surface: facial traits, lines, wrinkles; long face, square face, triangular face; the face is a map, even when it is applied to and wraps a volume, even when it surrounds and borders cavities that arc now no more than holes. The head, even the human head, is not necessarily a face. The face is produced only when the head ceases to be a part of the body, when it ceases to be coded by the body, when it ceases to have a multidimensional, polyvocal corporeal code when the body, head included, has been decoded and has to be overcoded by something we shall call the Face. This amounts to saying that the head, all the volume-cavity elements of the head, have to be facialized. What accomplishes this is the screen with holes, the white wall/black hole, the abstract machine producing faciality. But the operation does not end there: if the head and its elements arc facialized, the entire body also can be facialized, comes to be facialized as part of an inevitable process. When the mouth and nose, but first the eyes, become a holey surface, all the other volumes and cavities of the body follow. An operation worthy of Doctor Moreau: horrible and magnificent. Hand, breast, stomach, penis and vagina, thigh, leg and foot, all come to be facialized.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

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“Video Poem #8 [After These Messages]” (Video Art, 2011)

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

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Part 8 of an ongoing series of video poems made from found footage, inspired by Gilles Deleuze’s conception of the ‘refrain’. More duck tales. See more of my films on Vimeo.

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