Posts Tagged ‘Minimalism’

“Untitled Flower Pattern” (Pen and felt-tip on A4 card, 1997)

Wednesday, December 10th, 1997

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“By Chance I Met Barnett Newman on a Streetcorner: Fuck You Greenberg” (Found Photograph, 1997)

Saturday, December 20th, 1997

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“Newman’s paintings look easy to copy, and maybe they really are. But they are far from easy to conceive, and their quality and meaning lies almost exactly in their conception… The onlooker who says his child could paint a Newman may be right, but Newman would have to be there to tell the child exactly what to do. The exact choices of color, medium, size, proportion – including the size and shape of the support – are what alone determines the quality of the result, and these choices depend solely on inspiration or conception.” (Clement Greenberg, After Abstract Expressionism, 1962)

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“The Last Days of Sumer” (Vivid on A4, 1998, in the collection of Alexander Greenhough)

Monday, December 21st, 1998


The very first piece of ‘serious’ visual art I ever did, after reading a book of interviews with Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman on a bright summer’s day while living at a University flat on Fairlie Terrace in Wellington. I did another piece in blue vivid on the same day, which has subsequently been lost.

“When painters feel the need to make a shift toward self-discovery, they turn to black and white for a time.” (Barnett Newman)

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“Round [Black Holes Ain’t So Black]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Wednesday, December 1st, 1999

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“The lower the mass of the black hole, the higher its temperature. So as the black hole loses mass, its temperature and rate of emission increase, so it loses mass more quickly. What happens when the mass of the black hole eventually becomes extremely small is not quite clear, but the most reasonable guess is that it would disappear completely in a tremendous final burst of emission, equivalent to the explosion of millions of H-bombs.” (Stephen Hawking)

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“A human being is a part of a whole, called by us “universe,” a part limited in time and space. We experience ourselves, our thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of our consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” (Albert Einstein)

Variations on these photocopy works were included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“Squares [This Is Not A Black Square]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Thursday, December 2nd, 1999

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“When, in the year 1913, in my desperate attempt to free art from the ballast of objectivity, I took refuge in the square form and exhibited a picture which consisted of nothing more than a black square on a white field, the critics and, along with them, the public sighed, ‘Everything which we loved is lost. We are in a desert… Before us is nothing but a black square on a white background!'” (Kazimir Malevich)

Variations on these photocopy works were included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“Strings [Lines of Flight]” (Photocopies, 1999)

Friday, December 3rd, 1999

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“Individual or group, we are traversed by lines, meridians, geodesics, tropics, and zones marching to different beats and differing in nature. We said that we are comprised of lines, three kinds of lines. Or rather, bundles of lines, for each kind is multiple. We may be more interested in a certain line than in others, and perhaps there is indeed one that is, not determining, but of greater importance… if it is there. For some of these lines are imposed on us from outside, at least in part. Others sprout up somewhat by chance, from a trifle, why we will never know. Others can be invented, drawn, without a model and without chance: we must invent our lines of flight.” (Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus)

From a larger collection of photocopy works, two of which were used as the album cover for Jeff Henderson’s “Fuck You You Bureaucratic Fucks” recorded live at “Wayfarer Gallery Presents: A Festiva of Enjoyment” (Enjoy Gallery, 2002) and released by Postmoderncore Records in 2004. Henderson is a free-jazz/drone saxophonist from New Zealand, who I highly recommend checking out. Some of these prints were also included in the exhibition “Dick Whyte: Retrospective” (91 Aro Street Gallery, Wellington, 2005).

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“Who’s Afraid of Barnett Newman?” (Digital Painting, 2008)

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

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“It is not difficult to see how Greenberg’s own program for color-field painting and his ideas on the development of modernism leave little room for an explanation of Newman’s zips. In effect, they are the elements which support Greenberg’s ideas the least. In the rare cases when he describes the zips, he does so briefly and asserts that Newman’s art is not really geometrical and that there are other, less noticeable factors that are more important to an interpretation of his work.” (Samantha Krukowski, Was Greenberg Blind to Barnett Newman’s Zips?)

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