Posts Tagged ‘Gilles Deleuze’

Hot Internet Art: “The Official History of Net.art” (Vuc Cosic)

Friday, January 8th, 2010

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vuk2

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Check out The Official History of Net.art by Net.artist Vuc Cosic – it’s HOT. In Volume I: History of Art for Airports, Cosic presents us with a list of certain pivotal points in the ‘history’ (or ‘canon’) of art. The list begins conventionally with the Lascaux Caves, the Venus de Milo, Paul Cezanne, Kazimir Malevich, Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol (moving economically from Clement Greenberg’s modernist narrative to twentieth-century postmodernity). Then Cosic’s history of art takes an alternative route, dropping in on the Lumiere Brothers (who produced the worlds first moving-images), Star Trek (a science-fiction TV show whose politics verge on communist) and King Kong (a ‘classic’ Hollywood picture).

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Venus de Milo

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Marcel Duchamp

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By shifting mid-canon from classic pre-1960s sculptures, painters and conceptual artists to classical Hollywood movies and television, Cosic suggests that the so-called “fine art” of the second half of the twentieth-century is cinema (a highly contentious statement, which I would agree with). Next in Cosic’s canon is haiku (an ancient Japanese form of poetry) which, at first, seems highly unusual. However, the structure of haiku poetry (which involves juxtaposition, or cutting, of two images together) inspired Sergei Eisenstein’s theory of cinematic montage (Eisenstein was one of the first theorists to treat cinema as an art-form and features in later volumes of Cosic’s Official History). Furthermore (for better or worse) haiku has had a major impact on internet poetry (the 5-7-5 form popularized in the West could even be considered an internet meme). Cosic’s history lesson ends with Jodi, Alexei Shulgin and Heath Bunting (three of his Net.art collaborators) indicating that the future of art is the internet.

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Art for Airports (Kasimir Malevich - Black Square)

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haiku

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This canonical gag is only one layer of the work, however. Each artwork is then rendered in the style of an airport sign. By making works to be shown in a public space (like an airport) as everyday objects (signs rather than ‘fine art’) Cosic turns Duchamp and Warhol inside out. Arguably, Duchamp’s most famous works are the ‘readymades’ in which he takes everyday objects (a toilet, a bottle rack, a snow shovel) and puts them in art galleries (OMG – SO HOT!). Andy Warhol, on the other hand, took everyday objects (like the Brillo Box) and remade them giant sized, turning the gallery into a dysfunctional supermarket (also HOT). In these works Duchamp and Warhol place the everyday in a classical gallery setting. In Cosic’s work, on the other hand, classical masterpieces are placed in an everyday setting (highlighting the insitutional structure of lived space). Duchamp and Warhol say that “Everyday objects can be art.” Cosic reverses this by saying that “Art is the everyday.” All three then say together “Art is nothing more than a sign” (the mantra of the twentieth century art would become: “How can we get back to the real?”). All three queer the iconic nature of the art canon (it’s “looking like” something) pointing toward its relation to language (here I am also thinking of Rene Magritte’s This is Not a Pipe and Joseph Kosuth’s One and Three Chairs).

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Jodi.org

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Cosic’s work goes further than this, however. An airport sign, whose primary function is to be understood by people of all languages, is not generally thought of as “aesthetic” (particularly in the way ‘fine arts’ are) – it is designed to represent conceptual information (the toilet is here, the food is there). By reverting classical works of art to simple signifiers, Rosic makes it obvious that the content of these works does not lie in their material object (which can be brought and sold) but in the ideas, concepts and notions which pass through the various objects. When Cosic transforms Duchamp’s Nude Descending Staircase or Malevich’s Black Square into a simplified ideogram the implication is clear: although the visual image (medium, colour, line) changes, the concepts and ideas persist (this is particularly relevant when considering the effect search engines have on our relation to viewing art). In a sense, Cosic’s Art for Airports reinterprets the entire history of Western art as conceptual, rather than perceptual (in opposition to Andre Bazin’s defense of mimesis). Art, for Cosic, is a history of ideas, rather than a history of material goods. Art, then, is nothing more than philosophy and, as Gilles Deleuze writes, philosophy is nothing more than the creation of concepts. SO HOT!

In the second volume Classics of Net.art we are given a series of short introductions to Jodi, Bunting, Shulgin and Cosic. The section on Cosic (probably written by Cosic himself) reads “One of the world’s most celebrated net.artists, Vuk Cosic, has dedicated much of his life’s work to global communication, international understanding, and world peace. This motivation is reflected in imagery that flows throughout his art, and in his numerous contributions of works of art for humanitarian purposes.” Pretty lame, right? Fuck you – it’s HOT. I also highly recommend checking out Volume III: A History of Moving Images, Volume IV: A History of Art for the Blind and Volume V: Compressed History of Film.

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HOTLINKS

No Mans Land: Vuc Cosic Artist’s Website

The Official Hisory of Net.art Volume I: History of Art for Airports

The Official History of Net.art Volume II: Classics of Net.art

More HOT Web Art

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HOT Digital Film: “Il Popolo Della Liberta [People of Freedom]” (Mitteo Pasin, 2009)

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

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Fucking HOT digital film by Mitteo Pasin (a.k.a. Daimon0000) which I found stumbling around YouTube. The sound is taken from speeches by the current Italian president, Silvio Berlusconi (who is extremely corrupt) sourced from YouTube, accompanied by a quote from Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari: “it was not by means of a metaphor, even a paternal metaphor, that Hitler was able to sexually arouse the fascists.” (Capitalism and Schizophrenia) DAMN HOT!

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HOTLINKS

Mitteo Pasin YouTube Channel

More HOT Experimental Video

More Mitteo Pasin Video Art

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HOT Digital Theory: “Escape the Overcode: Activist Art in the Control Society” (Brian Holmes, 2010)

Monday, August 30th, 2010

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HOT digital theory by Brian Holmes. Holmes’ Escape the Overcode: Activist Art in the Control Society is an exploration of affectivist and activist aesthetics in the twenty-first century, heavily influenced by Deleuze and Guattari. HOT HOT HOT!

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“Let’s go straight to the point. How does art become subversive of the social order? How does it undermine normal, legitimate, accepted patterns of behavior, and how does it open up possibilities for the transformation of everyday life? What can subversive art accomplish in the political arena? And what are its limits, how can it exceed them in the future?” (Brian Holmes, Recapturing Subversion)

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HOTLINKS

Escape the Overcode

Deterritorialization

More HOT Animated GIFs

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